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3 “Live Your Message”Takeaways To Use Now

3 “Live Your Message”Takeaways To Use Now

Last weekend, I attended Marisa Murgatroyd’s annual event, Live Your Message Live. The 3-day virtual event was packed with so much goodness and I’ll be sharing my top 3 takeaways that you can use in YOUR business.

PLUS you’ll discover why you may lose motivation after attending an event even if you have the best of intentions.

If you’re ready to Illuminate YOU, message me.

#illuminatingyou

Incorporating Core Values into Your Content

Incorporating Core Values into Your Content

[0:00] When you think back to your childhood, were there topics that were taboo in your family? Today’s guest, Judy Tsuei, is someone who helps other people dive into some of these taboo topics. We’re going to talk about maybe how we can start to lean in, pay attention, and really uncover these stories and move on from them. 

 

[1:16] About Judy Tsuei

 

[2:26] Judy’s path to discovering Human Design and living as a Generator.

 

[4:01] Yong’s Human Design discovery and being a Projector as an impatient person.

 

[4:50] How discovering her Human Design gave Judy “permission” to be exactly who and how liberating it was for her. 

 

[5:30] Raising a Generator daughter and the energy it creates

 

[7:37] A good place to start to kind of assess maybe some of the topics that we learned growing up that were more taboo for us.

 

[9:36] “It’s so easy to compare our insides based on someone else’s outside, that’s what social media does so well.” 

 

[10:19] What being a yoga teacher and a Reiki practitioner helped Judy learn.

 

[11:09] How holding onto guilt and shame was a normal part of growing up for Yong

 

[13:57] How to dig deeper into emotional vulnerability and start to let people in through our journey.

 

[18:16] Breaking down in art therapy helped Judy make a breakthrough.

 

[18:48] Just because something worked one time does not mean that it will work the next time you try it. 

 

[21:02] Embracing compassion even when it’s outside of cultural norms

 

“It’s hard to take expectations from one set of cultures to put that lens on someone else”. 

 

[22:28] Judy’s 2-minute exercise and the mindfulness practices she offers on her podcast, F*ck Saving Face, every Friday

 

“On the other side of that challenge is a different person that can walk out of the room than walk in that room.” – Yong

 

[25:14] “Play is processing.”

 

[27:05] Judy’s favorite way to create content

 

[28:17] Judy’s journey of hiring junior copywriters and adding in a mentorship component to uplift other people and help them come up in their careers and their goals. 

 

[30:56] How to give ourselves permission to talk about what we want to talk about and stay true to who we are.

 

[33:22] “Content is about creating those meaningful connections.” 

 

[34:23] The practice of keeping yourself elevated and authentic and leaning into growing edges.

 

[35:18] Becoming a responsible content creator. 

 

[37:53] “If you’re ever in question of what it is that you’re posting, go back to your core values.”

 

[39:22] Connect with Judy

 

Website: https://www.fcksavingface.com/ 

Podcast: https://www.fcksavingface.com/podcast

Website: www.WildHeartedWords.com

 

[40:59] Come share your biggest takeaways from today’s episode inside the Arena of Awesome.

 

Read Full Transcript

Yong Pratt 0:00
When you think back to your childhood, were there topics that were taboo in your family? I know for me growing up in a biracial household, there were so many topics that we just didn't talk about. We either ignored them or we, we just, you know, didn't face them head on. So I'm excited to bring you today's guest because she's someone who helps other people dive into some of these taboo topics. And we're going to talk about maybe how we can start to lean in, pay attention, and really uncover these stories and move on from them.

Yong Pratt 0:34
Have you ever felt like there was something missing in your business, something holding you back from the success you're seeking? If so, you are not alone? For nearly 20 years, that's exactly how I felt as a business owner. It wasn't until I discovered Human Design, that it all became clear. And it turns out that I was the missing piece in my own business. Join me on this journey of discovering the real me and hear stories from other business owners, building businesses around all of their awesomeness. I'm Yong Pratt, and it's time my friend to Amplify Your Awesome™.

Yong Pratt 1:16
Hey there, everyone. Welcome back to the podcast. I'm Yong Pratt, your host and Expert Content Gold Mining Guide. And today, I am really thrilled to bring you another guest. She is someone that we connected years ago in a mastermind. I've been watching her silently on places like Facebook, seeing the awesome things that she's doing than many pivots that she's had. So I'm excited to bring her on today. Today's guest is Judy Tsuei and she is known for building real engagement through powerful content creation as a forward facing a brand voice representative. She's a Simon and Schuster author, and has been a guest on numerous top rated iTunes podcasts, as well as featured in Fast Company, BBC travel, mind body green, and so many more. Her popular podcast fluxing face empowers mental and emotional health for Asian Americans by breaking through taboo topics. This is gonna be a juicy one, Judy, welcome to the show.

Judy Tsuei 2:14
Thank you so much for having me. It's been so fun to watch your journey as well. And every time I get your emails in my inbox, I celebrate what it is that you're doing. Because we did meet so many years ago, and there have been so many life stages that have happened since then.

Yong Pratt 2:26
Oh, my gosh, yeah, I know, I just have my oldest just graduated from high school. So I mean, it's just all these big milestones. And, and I always celebrate yours as well, when I, whenever I see your your thing pop up in my newsfeed or I get your emails like, Oh, I can't believe she's doing this now. So I'm always just amazed. And I know, when we were connecting to this podcast, you also share that you're a big fan of human design. So I want to start there and talk about what is your human design because I love sharing the people that there's so many ways to create a business and create content. So let's talk about human design. What are you?

Judy Tsuei 3:03
I'm a generator. And what's funny is that when I first discovered that so the Asian-ness, which is part of what the podcast is about, I had so much judgment. I'm like, wait, that's it, I'm just a generator, like I'm not one of them, like special projectors or you know, anything that's like a little bit more rare. I want it to be like a plus. But then, the first time I discovered Human Design. I was living in Hawaii at the time. And I never heard about this before. And so I was invited to this kind of group gathering where they were learning about human design, but they would also, you know, choose someone and put their chart up and just kind of like read about, you know who they were. And so as I'm having this teacher, his name is Genoa read to me or just share with me about kind of like the way that I'm, I've been programmed all of my life just the way I was innately born and like, you know, things that have happened in my life, I started laughing out loud, because I was like, how do you know about my life entirely based on this random complex chart that you're looking at right here right now?

Yong Pratt 4:01
Yeah, I had the same experience and, and I found it through a local friend, actually. She had interviewed someone for her podcast introduced me to this to this mentor of mine. And yeah, learning these things. It really was like someone had had lived through the story of my life and opened up a random page and could tell me exactly, you know, certain things in my life. And I thought, whoa, like this magical window into this alternate universe was opened up and, and so I'm a projector. So when I learned that, I think I was kind of disappointed to because I was like, I have to wait. Why do I have to? I am not good at waiting. I am not a very patient person. And so if you're taking along a lot of deconditioning, and a lot of relearning and knowing that it's okay in this space where I get to wait, I get to create, which is the best part of what I get to do.

Judy Tsuei 4:50
I love that and it felt like you know, as you were describing, it just felt like I was just suddenly given permission to be exactly who I was. supposed to be and it felt very liberating. So for anybody who hasn't done their human design, I think it's a fascinating art, and science. And you know, it blends all of that I actually interviewed someone on my podcast who's a Human Design expert. And so the people, the listeners reached out to me to say, like, I loved hearing that interview, I love discovering, like, Oh my gosh, I can kind of get this guidebook to how I am and how I could better thrive in life with less hustle and more flow. But it's definitely a practice for sure.

Yong Pratt 5:30
Yeah, cuz it's so easy to fall back into the old habits, the way we were conditioned. And in your life being a generator. I'm married to a generator, so I see it play out. And you know, I have one one daughter, who is a manifesting generator, and another who's a projector like me. However, she has very different strengths in her projectors. So it's been interesting to sort of uncover and learn more about the people in my life and how I can then better stand up and serve them and ask them questions or engage with them. By understanding what they need from me like then the dynamic of that interchange, has really, really been beneficial for me in my life. And so I'm sure you, you have dealt with that as well. Because what is your daughter?

Judy Tsuei 6:11
She is she's also a generator. So yeah, we live

Yong Pratt 6:13
Oh a lot of energy in that household.

Judy Tsuei 6:14
Oh, yeah. What's funny, though, is I was mentioning to you that you know, currently, as we're filming this, I'm at my partner's house. And he also has two kids. And one of them came over to me yesterday, and she was like, she had a little horse on the back of her journal. So I said, Oh, you know, that's while their zodiac sign. She's like, Oh, well, then what's mine? So we went online, and we looked at it, and I was like, wait a minute. Wait, you're a horse, but you're a year older than my daughter. And so I was like, wait, have I been getting my daughter's zodiac sign wrong this whole time? Because I thought she was born three cycles after me. And we were both born in the year of the horse. So I'm still waiting for the verdict from my mom. Just see like what she is. But when it comes to like energy in that household? Yeah, for sure. We have a lot of strong personalities.

Yong Pratt 6:58
Yes, yeah. Which, which just makes it more fun. And yeah, just just takes gives us more evidence of who we were designed to be. And who are the people that we create in this world are designed to be and how we can guide them to discover their awesomeness, because so often, and this leads us to today's topic is this whole idea of taboo topics, things you just don't talk about, because they're either politically charged or emotionally charged. There's just something about them we don't talk about. So my question for you is, we think about these taboo topics, what is a good place to start to kind of assess maybe some of the topics that we learned growing up that were more taboo for us?

Judy Tsuei 7:37
Yeah, that's such a great question. I think that what I realized throughout this journey is I hadn't up until maybe, like five years ago, even start to look at what my core values are, I kind of just like live my life based on the success metrics that were set for me. And a lot of that was financial, you know, like, you better achieve a financial amount of success to be deemed worthy, or you know, that you've made it somehow. And so I started to look at my core values, because my life has always been built so differently, you know, I've lived and I think I counted this recently in over 26 cities and over like six countries, you know, in over like 10 states, and my daughter has come with me on a lot of those journeys, you know, she was born on Guam. We lived in a camper van. We ended up in Austin, then we moved to Asia, and then came back to California. So it's been a whole journey. And it's been hard to kind of figure out that I was built differently, as we touched upon, you know, at the start of the interview, and yet, the old programming is so strong of like, you know, you better if I interviewed a guest who said, Oh, you were supposed to be a doctor or lawyer, or if your parents were really progressive, and engineer, and it was definitely like, you know, how do I create my own model of what's important?

Judy Tsuei 8:50
So I think looking at your core values, and so one of my core values is freedom. And it's time freedom and location, independence and other core value is connection. That's so important to me. And so, you know, when I look at my life, I'm very rich and abundant in those spaces, and I've had other moms reach out to me just saying, like, how do you do that? How do you create community, wherever it is that you go. And then also just being able to have experiences, you know, like memories that are worth telling stories about since I'm a storyteller. And so I think you start with the core values and really assessing that. I think, also understanding when it comes to taboo topics, where do you hold a lot of guilt and shame? And if you're feeling those feelings, like what is it around? You know, I think that that's a great indicator to see like, what am I not supposed to talk about.

Judy Tsuei 9:36
Where do I feel like, you know, I'm not living up to what it is that I'm supposed to be living up to? And I think it's so easy to compare our insides based on someone else's outside, that's what social media does so well. Yes. And so it's hard to think that other people are also going to those states of vulnerability or that also, you know, other people are feeling challenged or struggling, and it's not until You open up and you start to have these honest, authentic conversations that you start to realize, like, Oh, wait, other people are going through this too. So then I don't have to feel that shame in not seeing that. And secondly, when you open up like that, I feel like it automatically creates a deeper connection with the person that you are talking to. I used to be a yoga teacher and a Reiki practitioner.

Judy Tsuei 10:19
And one of the things that I learned along that way was, when you meet someone for the first time, what you're seeking within them is their vulnerability. And it's not to, you know, try to attack or like, you know, understand what their soft points or weak areas are, it's because that vulnerability is what helps us feel safe enough to connect. And so if we're willing to share our vulnerability with them, then they're also willing to do that. And, you know, I can't even count how many times people around me have remarked, like, that stranger just totally opened up to you about their lives, or like, I've never shared this with anyone before. So like, I don't know why I'm sharing it with you. And so, I think that if we're willing to lean into that, and just, you know, reflect and be okay, with being imperfect, which is definitely not like an Asian, no, no, no, then I think that that's how we form those connections and that community.

Yong Pratt 11:09
So good. And this idea of holding on to this guilt and shame. That was a big part of growing up, you know, with with an Asian mom, that was just a huge, like, you just are made to feel guilty about certain things that if you don't achieve certain milestones, so your parents can show or tell your story and show up show you off to people around you. But that's not that's not a good thing. You know, we don't ever want to be standing out. That was another thing I learned like you Indian, which, which I think is so funny now, because for a long time, I was the only half Asian kid in my town with red hair and green eyes and freckles, like how do I not stand out right? amongst a lot of Caucasian people, amongst a lot of people from Mexico, I definitely did not fit in.

Yong Pratt 11:49
But in my culture, that was a thing, like you just, you just stick to your own path, you don't veer off of it, you don't want to cause embarrassment, you don't want to be looked upon, even though there's this expectation of achieving these things that may not be aligned with your values. And I remember, when I went to college, I wanted to go to medical school. And I quickly learned in my first semester, and I worked, I went to go work in a hospital, I took those classes. And I just thought you, I do not want to be doing this because my idea of what that profession looked like, through the eyes of my culture, were very, very different than what they actually turned out to be so. And I stopped with that path for a long time, because there was that guilt and shame of letting other people down. So the day that I graduated from college and decided to leave, pack up my suitcase and go travel the world and perform for a year, I honestly felt my parents were going to fall over. Because they were thinking, no way like you went and you did all the schooling, or you're just gonna waste it. You know, we don't do that you did this thing.

Yong Pratt 12:51
So yeah, so it's taken a lot of years to decompress from that. And I love my parents dearly. And they were doing the best from what they had learned. So it's just been a big learning process. And the human design element has helped me understand why some of those events may have occurred and unfolded in a way that they did versus doing something different. And I just needed to carve this own path. So yes, again, if you're listening, and you're feeling guilt, or shame, yes, start there. Because for me, that's kind of where I had to start. Because there were these just these, these blinking lights, like I knew what they were. And because I didn't, I wasn't equipped with how to emotionally deal with them. It's taken me a long time to unpack that. So let's talk about the emotions behind this because that's a whole different layer. Once we've discovered our core values, once we figure out those places where you might feel shame or guilt, how do we unpack the emotions? Because I think there's so many walls that everyone is taught to put up? How do we dig a little deeper into the emotional vulnerability, and start to let people in through our journey?

Judy Tsuei 13:57
I love that I think that, um, one of the things that I learned when I was in therapy, so I had an eating disorder that I battled for the better part of 15 years, and just really had to uncover a lot of just repressed anger to, you know, the eating disorder of choice, quote, unquote, that I had was pollinia. And it's a very violent like self attacking kind of eating disorder, because you're like, bingeing and you're purging and just really like pushing your limits and boundaries. And so I realized that I just had a lot of this, a lot of emotions that were stored up that I didn't know what to do with. And now that I have a daughter, I think, you know, especially in the schooling that she has, which really focuses on social emotional learning. I can see how valuable it is to start creating those tools from an early age. But that doesn't mean that you can't, you know, not learn them.

Judy Tsuei 14:43
So when I was in therapy, I was offered this feelings chart, and at the top is the predominant emotion. So there were like, you know, six to eight, like main emotions, and then underneath that all the gradients that you could feel and I looked at this sheet of paper, and I thought, Wait, what, you can feel all of these feelings. What do you mean? Like all I knew were like, maybe two of the top ones. And like that was it. And so starting to become aware that we can have all these gradients of emotions. And then the other thing that I learned in therapy is that feelings are not linear. And they don't always make sense. So they can pop up whenever in the middle of some other activity that has nothing to do with what it is that you're going through right now, it's kind of like when I was teaching yoga to, you know, anytime that we would do a class with a lot of hip openers, a lot of our emotions get stuck in our hips. And so once we open that up, I would often see an emotional response from people because we're also holding those emotions in our bodies, which is, again, why I think mindful movement and just movement in general, especially out in nature, if you can be outside is so helpful, you're processing through it in a different way.

Judy Tsuei 15:45
And I was just listening to a podcast interview with one of the guests who I'm bringing on who's going to be talking about ketamine, as like a mental emotional support therapy modality. And he was saying, like, when he was working in the ER, he had to put up walls because of the trauma that he saw day in and day out. And you don't even have time to move from delivering like terrible news to one family before you have to go address another one. And so he also had to go, you know, through his own journey of figuring out how to reconcile that. And so his journey took him through, you know, shamanic work, it took him through a lot of coaching courses, a lot of different things. So I think that also demonstrates that each of us is so individual and what it is that we need, so to go explore different modalities of what speaking to you right now, and maybe also what's at your growing edge and see, you know, what can you start to pursue that might be really helpful and you connecting to what it is that you specifically need. So some people are really into EMDR, you know, hypnotherapy or energy healing, or whatever it is, and it could totally look off the wall. I think this goes back to it doesn't need to be accepted by anybody else, because nobody else is living your life. I've been doing all these like peloton hit workouts, the coaches are great. And one of them says like, no one's gonna work out your tissue other than you. And so it's like such a good reminder of like, Yes, that is true. Like, I need to be the one who's gonna be responsible for this.

Judy Tsuei 17:03
So I think that, you know, figuring out, like, how can you express these feelings in ways that feel safe, because initially, it's probably not going to feel safe, it's probably gonna feel very terrifying. And even in the current relationship that I'm in, I've had to really practice over and over again, of how to find that safe and secure place. And thankfully, my partner has been remarkable in that and super communicative. And, but I can see that my pattern is to regress and hide and then just be like, I don't need anybody, I'm not going to rely on anybody, I don't need anything. And so you know, starting to understand yourself really well, that quote, Know thyself, which by the way, I'm obsessed with the show Ted lasso. So if anybody's watched it, he like says that line in the show, and he's like, Know thyself in this moment, that's like a joke, but it's true. So knowing yourself, and then allowing yourself giving yourself permission to explore whatever it is, for me, one of the best way that I've ever found to express my feelings is through art therapy. And keep in mind, I cannot draw at all like, I can draw a stick figure, maybe. But I can definitely collage and I can definitely bring a lot of materials together to make something.

Judy Tsuei 18:16
And it was through art therapy that I actually had, you know, a break down to have a break through, like, I started crying, I am not one of those people who cry in public. It is rare that I still, like cry, have to watch a sad movie in order for me to access this emotion sometimes, but again, that's what I need. That's how I do it. And then you grow and evolve from there. And, you know, I always try to remind myself that what works one time, may not work the next time, but that's why we keep learning and growing. So we can figure out like, okay, so where, what are the tools that I can rely upon in that moment.

Yong Pratt 18:48
And so many things that you share in this process, as I'm listening, there are so many parallels to what we need to uncover in our lives that translate into our business are the things that we're holding back on ourselves in our businesses. I know I've done that, too. Again, this this fear of not wanting to stand out, like that was just a core identity I had growing up and how do I now unlearn that, and I love that you talk about different modalities. And because it worked one time does not mean that will work the next time you try it.

Yong Pratt 19:17
So I think we're hard on ourselves in so many different ways. But especially when it comes to uncovering the emotions, uncovering these old stories, discovering these patterns we have in our lives, there has to be so much openness, and so much fluidity. I feel and we have to let go of so many things. And I think this is why many of us don't go down this route. willingly because there's just these big messes we don't really want to deal with against we dealt with them once or we thought we did. But like you said, we're often repressing them in our body. So the idea of getting out in nature and using movement mindfully, not in any sort of structured way. If you want it to be structured, awesome, do that. But for most of us, using movement, to be that space where we can let go of other things, that's such a beautiful idea for us all to really consider today. So if you're listening, and you're, you're outside, or you're inside, you're inside, I want you to go outside and just take in that air and move.

Yong Pratt 20:20
However, it feels good for you just whether that's blowing in the breeze or standing on one foot or stretching to your side, we got a new puppy recently, and I'm always in awe that he's always stretching. And I think there's so many things that we forget that we forget to stretch, just like we forget to breathe when we're anxious. And we have to consciously remind ourselves that God has given us so many wonderful practices to go and do, but movement I feel is kind of at the core, if we can get our bodies involved our minds, I feel for me anyway, my mind is usually a little more willing to be open and to give up things and to feel things when my body is involved in that.

Judy Tsuei 21:02
Yeah, and I wanted to point out, you said, like, you know, it is a practice the emotions that are going to come up or just this practice of life. I think when I used to teach yoga a lot, too, I'd say like, this is a practice and the practice isn't what's happening in the four corners of your yoga mat. When I was in therapy, it was not in the four corners of the Office of the therapist room. It's out in the world, like that is the practice. And so there, that's been really challenging. And even just this last weekend, I had these like experiences with my parents who again, I have learned to have much more compassion. And it's been a challenge to be raised in a culture that's completely the antithesis of the culture that they were raised in, you know, so they're like, born in China, fled to Taiwan, they grew up in Taiwan, then they came to the States, but I grew up in the States. And I've actually gone back to both of those countries. And so a lot of the values are diametrically opposed. And it's hard to take expectations from one set of culture to put that lens on someone else.

Judy Tsuei 21:57
And so you know, even now, I was like, I am about to turn 43. How is this still happening to me? How am I still being triggered? And it goes back to the idea of a practice. And I think what you said that suggestion of going outside and just like tuning in, to feel what it feels like and ask and connecting and asking your body what it is that it needs. I don't know how often we give ourselves permission to do that. And to be able to do it in a way where you're not judging it like, Oh, well, you know, this is such a loopy kind of movement that I want to do. How can I do this.

Judy Tsuei 22:28
So oftentimes, when I was teaching yoga, I would also encourage people to take like two minutes in class, close your eyes, so you're not paying attention to what anybody else is doing. No one's paying attention to you. And just truly move with that kind of intuitive sense of what's going to feel good. On Fridays, on my podcast, I offer mindfulness practices. And one of the recent episodes was dying bug pose, which when I discovered it, I thought it was hilarious, because it totally forced me to like break through what I thought yoga was supposed to be or the seriousness of life. And you basically just lie on your back and stick your arm straight up into the sky, your leg straight up into the sky, like your reverse, you know, upside down or your U shape. And then you take a deep breath in, and then as you exhale, you just shake everything out all your arms and your limbs or whatever. So you're a dying bug. And then you just plop onto the ground. And it was such a playful moment. And so if you were also raised like me, where play was not necessarily something that was very much encouraged, you were serious, you had to achieve certain academic goals, or you know, family responsibilities, whatever it was, I think being able to infuse play into your life, however, that's gonna look small or big is super important. I just had three people recommend to me they're like, have you been in the ocean lately? Because I surf and I was like, No, I haven't. Like, yeah, maybe you should go get some vitamin C, like SEA. So yeah,

Yong Pratt 23:53
Yeah, absolutely. The idea of play. I also didn't have that growing up. I mean, I reached a certain age and, you know, the, the nighttime hugs went away, because I was too old. And going out to play was not something that it was ever encouraged. And I recently interviewed Jeff Harry, who was a play expert on the podcast. Yeah, we did a two part series on play. And he gave so many different ideas. And I was like, that's play, I had no idea because I had never been exposed to that or really explored that I just thought, again, conditioning. Play is for kids, adults don't play. So giving myself some space and some freedom to do things that are more playful like this, you know, I got to go try this dying bug pose. I don't know that I've ever actually done this. But, you know, it reminds me to when I was teaching choreography and dance classes. I love the improvisation classes the best because people could interpret them in so many different ways. And I thought that was so beautiful. Nobody was putting up guidelines. So if you're listening, go find a yoga class. Go find a playful yoga class, go find an improvisational dance class where you can just there's no new rules and I think as adults Going through spaces where there are no rules. It's really challenging. However, on the other side of that challenge is a different person that can walk out of the room than walk in that room.

Judy Tsuei 25:14
Oh, my God, I love that. Yeah, I mean, I feel like play is processing. And if we give ourselves it's what, as a parent, I've learned from my daughter that one of the essential ways she needs to, you know, process through the emotions and the experiences that she has is to be able to play to be physical to get out there. And recently, one of the fellow moms that I know created a group text message, it's adult summer camp, because we're constantly focused on our kids, bringing them to jujitsu classes, skateboarding classes, foreign camp, like whatever it is, and then they're having the greatest time. And then we're just running around like China, like, keep up with them. And so then we were like, wait, wait, wait, hold on a second. I think the parents need like a summer camp too. So now we've, you know, built in surf we've built in yoga classes we've built in, like, you know, working out like whatever it is that we adults also yet a little bit of fun.

Yong Pratt 26:03
What a great idea! That is, I think we need to mass market that to have adult summer camp because yeah, how often do adults just gets it play and, and, and relate to one another on a completely different level? Because a lot of times when you meet other adults is kind of like the surface thing. And like you said, you have the ability to get people to share their stories really quickly with you. Do you have a line for in your chart? Um, oh, yes, I do. Yeah. Do I ask Do I. So yeah, that idea to connect and really easily connect to people. You know, it's one of our gifts. And I love that. So I want to shift the conversation a little bit, I could talk about these topics all day long, I do want to talk about content, because that's such a big part of our business, the idea of creating content for other people to enjoy other people to learn from, to move them closer and bring them into our, to our spheres, so that we can really help them achieve their goals. So my question is to you, what is your favorite way to create content?

Judy Tsuei 27:05
Hmm, I love this. I love it. Because I think that, you know, we've been told, like, structure out your content, plan it all out, like all that kind of stuff, which I think is very beneficial. And I think that there are, it's suitable for certain personality types, or certain business ventures and you know, things like that. I've also realized that just as much as we're learning the rules, or whatever best practices for business, you really got to adopt it for yourself, and like your business and your audience. And that's also been just kind of a journey for me to learn, like, you know, I would love to say that I have it all mapped out to make my life easier.

Judy Tsuei 27:40
But the most powerful content that I created from outliving life, taking a moment to process what's going on, and then being able to share it. Because I'm a generator. You know, for me, content just comes through really, really quickly. It's one of the pieces of feedback that I get all the time, which is like, how do you generate that content? And I was like, how do you not because I feel like when I don't it's a it's a big challenge for me, I feel really like bottled up. But I've had to learn, you know, to, even though that that might be the case that that sparks inspiration. And that's where my most powerful content comes from. Okay, that's great, and how can I still repurpose it work smarter.

Judy Tsuei 28:17
So take some of those tools and techniques and apply it to the way that I'm built. So part of it has been for me recently, you know, building a team around me so hiring an assistant than hiring a few Junior copywriters, and starting to also use that kind of mentorship component that I always look to. And I feel like teaching is such an innate part of what it is that I do that I want to help uplift other people and help them come up in their careers and their goals and whatever it is. And so that has also been just like a really interesting kind of pivot of learning, like, okay, so I can still access and grow and build the content, but maybe I also don't have to be the only point person for it, maybe I can also start to train other people who can, you know, write similarly or who can, you know, bring their viewpoints forward in a way that aligns with my brand and my voice. And so that's been a very interesting journey, too.

Yong Pratt 29:14
This idea of mentorship is really interesting to me because I like you, I find that I'm a teacher, by my very nature. So I've never really thought about that when you bring people onto your team, you become this mentor for them whether or not we know that the idea that there's this exchange of energy, this exchange of knowledge and it can go both directions I think is really sort of a key piece of that so and I love it too that you could you could actually get your team to go source ideas for you right they could go meet they could go to your ears and social media, they could be your eyes watching videos. I just I love that idea.

Yong Pratt 29:49
So the idea that you said that you get a lot of inspiration on the fly doing that cuz I know that society or gurus tell us you need to batch content for Six months. And it sounds really awesome in theory. But then six months later, when you're a different person and your content is still coming out, to me, that feels a little bit disingenuous. I'm just not Yeah, like who I am in that moment. So I don't, I used to have a year of content planned out ahead. I used to be really, really good at that. But any more like, you know, what, if I can be a couple of weeks ahead, that's good enough for me, because then I have the ability to, to mold and move and pivot if I need to, up in that space. So thank you for sharing that. So I want to ask you to how do you make sure that your core values your authentic self is being translated in your content? Because again, there's that conditioning that comes up and says, Wait, that's a topic we're just not going to talk about where we talk about it, it's only going to be surface level? How do we give ourselves permission to really talk about what we want to talk about and stay true to who we are.

Judy Tsuei 30:56
So we're currently working on a memoir, and the book coach that I've been working with has told me, you know, you have to first think about your muse, which I think if you translate it into business, it's who your target audiences and who you're speaking to. But, you know, secondly, making sure that as you're creating this content, and being very vulnerable, and deep and honest, because the memoir, you know, it's a prescriptive memoir, so it's taking stories and experiences that I've had, and then sharing the lessons that I've learned along the way through them. But also making sure that I'm not re traumatizing myself, nor my traumatizing my reader by sharing this information. So I think that making sure that healing, and you know, whatever the growth opportunity is, like you being a responsible leader in that, and you making sure that it's not like, you have to package it perfectly, I'm not saying like, you have to, like, put this content out. And it's got to be pretty wrapped in a bow and like you already know, the conclusion, because that's not how life works. And I think that part of what I'm hoping to do is by being open and transparent, that we break through, like what social media can create.

Judy Tsuei 31:58
So instead starting to see like someone's humanity, and at the same time, you know, not making it someone else's problem, like, we're not going on there to complain about our lives. But instead, we're going on there to like, you know, share our process of how we're moving through this, and then what we're learning or, you know, where you still have questions, and then just making sure that you're being a responsible creator in that way. I think that that is very important. And I think that also, you know, I think one of my key superpowers has always been to the very authentic like, you would, I would always joke, like, you would see it on my face, if I was not happy, I don't have the ability to like, hide that. Even though I, you know, was trained, and I learned it, but then I realized, like, my inherent nature is to not do that, I will just get very quiet. So I won't like, you know, be talking shit, excuse the expletives. You had to say it at the beginning of the show, too. I was like, Oh, my gosh, that's right, like my podcast has an expletive in it. But, um, at the same time, you know, just, I think that just from my own personal experience of the more that you like, just peel back the curtain a little bit and let people see like that you are a real human being in personal settings, and in professional settings, I feel like that's never put me down a wrong path. In fact, it's really been such a benefit and an advantage.

Judy Tsuei 33:22
Because, again, you're creating those meaningful connections. So I have people who've been following my newsletter for years, so I've never met, I have people who've been, you know, in my facebook group, or like on social media, and just sending me these really personal messages, about their lives. And I think that that's such an honor and a gift that someone feels that safe and trusting of me, considering we've never met in person, you know, like, and it's only through the power of my words and the content that I put out there. But even when I used to publish a lot for like my degree, and and all these other platforms, I'd have readers reaching out to me too, and I would always remind myself, too, that for every person who's reaching out to you, there's so many other people who feel the same way. But they just didn't take the time or the energy to send you that message. But if you get one of those, like positive, affirming, you know, pieces from someone, I put it up on a praise wall, I like, print it out, I stick it up. Because being an entrepreneur can be very lonely, especially if you're doing the type of work where you're supporting other people and empowering other people. You know, you can definitely have doubts that imposter syndrome and everything else can come through.

Judy Tsuei 34:23
So what can you do as a practice to like keep yourself elevated? So yeah, when it comes to like being authentic, like, whatever your growing edges, this is also another reminder is, someone told me before that, and this was years and years ago that whatever you publish is going to live forever on the internet somewhere. I mean, just imagine those people who've like broken up with other people and then trying to get all your Facebook images off or like what it's like, it's a bear. So even though we're writing to our consciousness right now, and of course, we're going to grow and evolve as a person source. And our ideas might change. And my friend was just quoting this religious leader that she follows. And she said that this person had gone from like a very devout person in the faith to being a complete polar opposite. And so, you know, I think Glenn and Doyle does a lot of that same stuff, too. She shares with you where she was where she is now.

Judy Tsuei 35:18
But just to be responsible in terms of how can I be at my growing edge when I'm creating this content? And how can I be responsible for like, you know, how I feel now I'm being really authentic and true. And just also knowing and having that compassion and that grace that in the future, you might have a different viewpoint? Are you going to be okay with that, like, you know, my neighbor always says, like spacing, Grace, spacing, Grace. And then I'm going to curse one more time. But when I was living in Koi, I met this girl who, you know, she's a yoga teacher, and we were talking, she was on my first friends. And at dinner one night, she said, I mean, don't future fuck yourself. And I was like, Ah, that's a really good way to put it. Like, we're not living, you know, and hopefully not like so much that you're anticipating the future and like trying to, and avoiding being present. But also just being cognizant, like, there is a future self out there of you. Like, yes, you know, how do you want to feel, then?

Yong Pratt 36:16
Yeah, and the term you use be a responsible creator, I think that's a really just a good reminder. Maybe we need to put that word up on our wall too, just to remind us that, yes, we want to share, but I've seen people take it too far to where when you read their posts, or you see him on video, I sometimes get triggered by them, because they're showing too much. Is it just too revealing? And I know that I've personally struggled with, how much do I share? Like, how much do I want to put out there Am I going to feel like this later, because I know in my business life, I've taken so many pivots and and while I still 100%, believe in everything I've ever created. But thinking about that future you and is that message you're sharing right now, going to number one, put you in a good light in the light that you want to be seen in, versus something that could be triggering to someone and we can definitely all be triggering to other people. I'm not saying never do that, or Judy's not saying never do that by any means.

Yong Pratt 37:11
Just be responsible and, and take ownership of what you are creating. And by doing that, taking ownership and thinking about that muse, that target audience, those two things combined are a really powerful formula for all of us to take from this day forward and think about, okay, what I'm creating, here's a space I want to create from because it's so easy just just to create in the moment, because we feel like we have to versus being really present and sharing authentically, and sharing the journey that we are going through in a way that's going to really benefit or showcase something that we truly believe in.

Judy Tsuei 37:53
Yeah, and if you need a check and balance, go back to the core values that we talked about at the very beginning. And I have different core values for like, my personal life, my relationship life, and then my professional life. And I mean, there's some overlap. But you know, there are different priorities too, for like, which core values are most meaningful in this phase of my life in this particular experience, or whatnot? So if you're ever in question of like, what it is that your posting, you know, going back to the core values of why you're doing what it is that you're doing, like does it fit? Is it in line with all those things? And there are definitely times where, like, I've had other people read my writing before I publish it just to make sure. Before I recorded a podcast episode, you know, things like that. So I do have those checks and balances in place, just to be sure when I have a question.

Yong Pratt 38:39
That's a good point to having someone on our team or someone in our tribe that we can call upon and say, does this resonate? Does it sound like me? Am I staying true and authentic to who I am? Because sometimes without those checks and balances, we can go a little bit outside of what our core values would say, Judy, I could really continue to you for so long, we could talk for hours and hours, I am sure. I do want to make sure that we're being conscientious of time. And I want to have your social media be a demonstration of how you put your core values into action. So where is the best place on social media, we're on the on the internet, that people can come see you putting your core values and your authentic self into action.

Judy Tsuei 39:22
I love that. So there's two different you know, kind of ventures, the wild hearted words is where I've done a lot of strategic content marketing with all of my clients, and so on Instagram, it's kind of also where I've used it as just a personal space to kind of share my journey into everything from motherhood, entrepreneurship, to relationship to whatever it is. So that's like a very authentic kind of view of me. And then in the F*ck Saving Face Podcast. There's a corollary website as well. It's fun, they'll be you. But I published episodes three times a week. So the first day Monday is going to be a personal essay so you can really get a sense of you know, writing and Storytelling there once is an interview with an expert that elaborates on the theme that I set forth on Monday. And then Friday is a mindfulness practice. That's kind of the healing, wrap it all up together for the week that we've, you know, finish up for whatever we whatever conversation we started on Monday. So that's another really great way to kind of just see storytelling in a different kind of way, and content creation in a different kind of way.

Yong Pratt 40:22
Amazing, I will definitely put all of those in the show notes. But I just want to say thank you so much, Judy, I've had such a fun time reconnecting with you catching up about where life has taken us in so many different directions over the past couple of years. And just want to thank you for showing up authentically, and being an example for how other people can show up in their businesses by being who they truly are, by living into their human design, if they know that, and just really using the creations they put out into the world really be that Guiding Light and beacon for other people to find them. So thank you so much.

Judy Tsuei 40:56
I love it. Thank you.

Yong Pratt 40:59
Oh my goodness. Did you love today's interview with Judy as much as I did. She is someone that could literally talk to you for hours and hours and hours on end, because there's just no end to the direction we can take our conversation. So I want to hear from you. What were your biggest takeaways? And Aha, from this episode? What action items are you going to put into practice today with this week to move your messaging forward to create deeper connections with your audience to take your content to another level? come and share your insights with me inside my Facebook community, the Arena of Awesome. Until we connect in there, my friends, go out there today and Amplify Your Awesome™.

Yong Pratt 41:44
Thanks for tuning in to the Amplify Your Awesome™ podcast. Let's continue this conversation inside my Facebook community the arena of awesome while it's still free and open to new members, come share your biggest takeaways and Aha. Plus, every week inside the arena, you'll get access to me and I may even share content I don't share anywhere else. Until next time, my friend, go out there today and Amplify Your Awesome™!

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Incorporating core values into your content - Amplify Your Awesome™
Content Gold Mining Versus “Gary Vee” Style Content Repurposing

Content Gold Mining Versus “Gary Vee” Style Content Repurposing

[0:01] I fell for it. Hook, line, and sinker. I was once drawn into the world where MORE became my motto. I wore it like a badge of honor. I was always striving to be more, do more and create more. I stopped listening to the many signs my body was telling me to slow down on my quest for more. Ignoring those signals, landed me in the hospital for test after test, and ultimately being sent home, hooked to a heart monitor for days. The allure of more is a strong force, and few make it out unscathed. In today’s episode, I’m going to share how I’ve made it to the other side of more, and how I can help you do the same…but only if you’re ready to embrace a world where less is the new norm? 

[1:44] Here at Amplify Your Awesome, we help course creators and coaches ditch content overwhelm, tap into endless supplies of social media content, and make money from the content they’ve already created. 

[2:22] Today we’re diving into Content Gold Mining versus “Gary Vee” style content repurposing. It’s a question I’ve been getting a lot of lately, so I wanted to, well, set the record straight. 

[2:37] If you haven’t already listened to the last episode number 333. The Myth of More, I highly recommend you press pause and take a listen to that tale before continuing with this episode at http://www.yongpratt.com/333 

[2:56] That time when Yong stood firmly in the belief that repurposing content was THE marketing strategy everyone needed to use…

[3:21] How Yong used 3 content repurposing automation tools to replace her full-time Virtual Assistant 

[3:42] When I talk about content repurposing, or the traditional “Gary Vee” style content repurposing the way it’s talked about these days, here’s what I mean. 

“Traditional, “Gary Vee” Style Content Repurposing the act of taking a large piece of content and extracting smaller chunks which you can then share.” 

– Yong Pratt

[4:18] Reason #1 for “Gary Vee” Style Content Repurposing 

Number one: it looks like you’re everywhere. And number two: one can more easily establish their expertise by having more of these smaller pieces of content. 

[5:02] The reason why traditional “Gary Vee” style content repurposing is costing you money. 

[5:33]  What you need in place to get hundreds of pieces of content

[6:12] Opportunity #1 Yong experienced by promoting and advocating for the use of 3 content repurposing tools 

[6:33] Opportunity #2 Yong experienced by promoting and advocating for the use of 3 content repurposing tools 

[7:10] That time when things started to crumble before Yong’s eyes 

[7:31] Some reasons why traditional “Gary Vee” style content repurposing didn’t work for my clients 

[8:15] The Two Myths Yong uses to describe traditional “Gary Vee” style content repurposing 

[8:41] The weight of Yong’s 1000s upon 1000s of pieces of content and its opportunity cost 

[9:42] The lesson Yong learned from training Freebie seekers and the money it cost 

[10:21] That time when Yong has months and months of social media posts pre-scheduled turned into social media dormancy 

[10:59] What Yong discovered during that social media dormancy  

[11:50]  The tool Yong used to FINALLY be able to see all her beautiful content 

[12:45] What Yong recommends you do today with all YOUR awesome content 

[13:26] The patterns that emerged and the questions Yong began to ponder regarding her discovery 

[14:28] “Instead of focusing on transforming one piece of content into hundreds using the “Gary Vee” method of content repurposing, Content Gold Mining offers you many ways to monetize all your beautiful content.” – Yong Pratt 

[15:05] “Right now, at this moment, you have endless gifts you could offer to the world and get paid for doing so.” – Yong Pratt 

[15:24] Questions to ponder and experiment with starting today…

[15:32] What have you stopped creating content today? For a week? Or even a month? 

[15:38] What if you reinvested some of that creation time into unearthing the gold from your own content goldmine? 

[15:47] What if you could turn your massive amounts of content into endless streams of income? 

[15:55]  What if you could tap into that Gold Mine every time you wanted or needed to:

  • Take a family vacation 
  • Hire a virtual assistant to help you put systems in place so that you could sell all the content that you want unearth. 
  • Hire someone to clean your house, do yard work, prep your meals and so much more so that you could free up time to spend with those you love? 
  • What about retire your parents or spouse? 
  • And this is just the tip of the iceberg of what you could experience by mining for the gold in your content. 

[16:25] A testimonial Yong got after a Content Gold Mining Session with 1:1 Client, Susan”

“Wow, just wow. Yong certainly knows her stuff and the potency of content, namely your content. She quickly and effortlessly walks you through the value of your current content. She offers amazing options on delivering your hard work and talent found in your content and monetizing them as you offer your prospects irresistible offers. It’s an emotional moment, when you realize your content can be massaged into other platforms to help others you must work with Yong.”

[17:42] “Monetizing content is where traditional style or “Gary Vee” style content repurposing really misses the mark. Its real focus has been on visibility and exposure, neither of which is a guarantee for sales.” – Yong Pratt 

[18:42] Wouldn’t your time be better spent monetizing the content you already have? 

[18:48] What if it didn’t have to be either-or? 

[18:52] If you could create endless content for social media, and endless streams of income from the content you already have, without the overwhelm? Would you want to know how to do it? 

[19:06]  You, my friend absolutely deserve to have both! And the time to make it happen is now. The doors to Your Content Gold Mine, my six-month mentorship will be opening up soon, and I’d love to be your guide on this amazing adventure. 

[19:22] What’s included inside Yong’s 6-Month Mentorship

[19:46]  So my friend…

  • If creating less content appeals to you…
  • If monetizing the content you already have appeals to you…
  • If having documented systems and processes to mine for the gold in your content appeals to you…
  • If scaling or staffing your business appeals to you….
  • If seeing all the possibilities in your awesome content appeals to you, then Your Content Gold Mine might be for you. 

[20:19] Let’s talk about you and your awesome content. It’s Yong’s gift for being a listener of the podcast. All you have to do is click on the image 👇

Book a Call with Yong

[21:15] Get more goodness, tips, and insider secrets for Yong inside her Facebook community, the Arena of Awesome, while it’s still free and open to new members. Come share your biggest takeaways and ahas. Plus, every week inside the Arena, you’ll get access to me and I may even share content I don’t share anywhere else. Until next time, my friend, go out there today and Amplify Your Awesome!

Read Full Transcript

0:01
I fell for it. Hook, line, and sinker. I was once drawn into the world where MORE became my motto. I wore it like a badge of honor. I was always striving to be more, do more and create more. I stopped listening to the many signs my body was telling me to slow down on my quest for more. Ignoring those signals, landed me in the hospital for test after test, and ultimately being sent home, hooked to a heart monitor for days. The allure of more is a strong force, and few make it out unscathed. In today's episode, I'm going to share how I've made it to the other side of more, and how I can help you do the same. But only if you're ready to embrace a world where less is the new norm?

0:58
Have you ever felt like there was something missing in your business? Something holding you back from the success you're seeking? If so, you are not alone? For nearly 20 years, that's exactly how I felt as a business owner. It wasn't until I discovered Human Design, that it all became clear. And it turns out that I was the missing piece in my own business. Join me on this journey of discovering the real me and hear stories from other business owners building businesses around all of their awesomeness. I'm Yong Pratt, and it's time my friend to Amplify Your Awesome™!

1:44
Hey there, Amplifiers! You're listening to episode number 334 of the Amplify Your Awesome™ podcast. As always, I'm your host Yong Pratt, Expert Goldmining Guide, and the Chief Amplifier of Awesome. Here at Amplify Your Awesome™, we help course creators and coaches ditch content overwhelm, tap into endless supplies of social media content, and make money from the content they've already created. And that my friend is the very reason why today's episode came to be.

2:22
Today we're diving into Content Gold Mining versus "Gary Vee" style content repurposing. It's a question I've been getting a lot of lately, so I wanted to well set the record straight.

2:37
If you haven't already listened to the last episode number 333. The Myth of More, I highly recommend you press pause and take a listen to that tale before continuing with this episode. I promise. I'll be right here when you get back.

2:56
For today's lesson to make sense. I want to take you back a few years or so. At the time, I stood firmly in the belief that repurposing content was THE marketing strategy everyone needed to use. I just couldn't understand why not everybody knew about it and not everybody applied this strategy in their own businesses.

3:21
At the time of content repurposing was saving me so much time and money. I was even able to replace a full-time virtual assistant with a couple of tools that automated the processes for me. And one of them that actually magically spit out hundreds of pieces of content that I could share across social media.

3:42
When I talk about content repurposing, or the traditional "Gary Vee" style content repurposing the way it's talked about these days, here's what I mean. It's the act of taking a large piece of content, otherwise known as long form content, like this podcast episode, a blog post a video, and extracting smaller chunks, also known as micro content, which you can then share. The idea of this style of content repurposing is to sprinkle these smaller pieces everywhere so that,

4:18
Number one: it looks like you're everywhere. And number two: one can more easily establish their expertise by having more of these smaller pieces of content.

4:31
The idea of content repurposing has been used and talked about by many, yet was popularized by Gary Vaynerchuk or Gary Vee, as he's known to many. He even named the method after himself - the "Gary Vee" method. In his methodology, he advocates turning every long form piece of content into hundreds of pieces of media and sharing it well, basically everywhere. I will admit the idea of turning one piece into hundreds is brilliant!

5:02
Extract lots of nuggets and share them so that you can spend less time creating long form content check. Share these nuggets liberally across social media in a strategic manner that leads your tribe to take the next steps and ultimately buy something from you. Uhh, NO! This is where I see traditional or "Gary Vee" style content repurposing, falling apart for most, myself included.

5:33
In this day and age creating hundreds of pieces of content, using the right tools is the easy part. But there's one caveat. Before you can repurpose your content to share, you'll have to spend your time or pay someone else to set up those tools for you or do it all manually. And this is what I did for years. I set up three content repurposing tools for other business owners, so that they could put the "Gary Vee" method to work for them. Talking about and promoting these tools led to two really amazing opportunities.

6:12
The first is I was invited by the founder of these three tools to represent their brand at podcast movement in 2019. For four days, I talked to current and potential users of the software about its awesomeness. It was an absolute honor to represent this brand at such a large event.

6:33
After podcast movement, I pitched the company owner on an idea that I had. And I found myself as soon after co hosting monthly training sessions for users of the tool for over a year. Being the interviewer of the series, teaching others how I personally use the tools, and connecting with others was so much fun!

6:56
I was riding high on my ability to set up these tools, share them far and wide, and was affectionately called the "Repurposing Queen" or the "Repurposing Ninja" by my students and my one on one clients.

7:10
It wasn't long after though that I started to see things crumble, the clients for whom I'd set up repurposing tools came back to me frustrated and overwhelmed, not with me. But because they didn't actually know what to do with all the content I made it possible for them to obtain.

7:31
Most of these clients didn't have a big marketing team like Gary Vee does. Most were solopreneurs or had teams of one, maybe two part timers. They didn't have systems or processes in place to deal with or distribute so much content. They didn't have a plan to use that content to gain new clients or sell products with their content. They basically created mounds of content, just to create it and I had enabled them to do so. After all, creating all that content sure sounded good...until it wasn't.

8:15
That's why I refer to this type of traditional "Gary Vee" style content repurposing as the Myth of More. I also refer to this as the A.B.C. content philosophy. It's the myth that says we must Always Be Creating. It turns out that more was not the answer for any of these business owners that I had helped.

8:41
Around the same time, I was getting overwhelmed and frustrated myself. Like my clients, repurposing, my own content was the easy part. It was automated. I was the proud owner of 1000s upon 1000s of pieces of content, after all. Distributing all the content with any sort of strategy became a full time gig on top of everything else I had to do in my business. I was quite literally drowning in my own content. It was weighing on me, beckoning me to let it see the light of day once again. I was as Michael Gerber talks about in his book, The E-Myth, working IN my business and not ON it. I was so busy planning and distributing all my content that I never took time to document or systematize my processes, so that I could ultimately hand them off to someone else.

9:42
And the real bummer was that despite the massive amounts of content I shared across just about every platform, I was not seeing more sales. It was actually the opposite. Because I had so much money content available. People didn't feel the need to hire me, when all they had to do was turn to all of my free content, and it was so copious. I was so good at creating content that I have literally trained my audience to expect everything for Free.

10:19
Talk about a sucker punch!

10:21
I had spent years chasing more and helped my clients do the same. And now more was coming back to bite me in the butt. I spent the next year or so extracting myself from social media. I was still producing podcasts and connecting with my list while my presence on social media became pretty much non-existent. To this day, I still don't post a lot on social media, which is odd, since I was once called the "Repurpose queen." And for a year or so, I had content scheduled out for months at a time.

10:59
During my year of social media dormancy, I discovered something that was literally right in front of me that I completely overlooked in my quest for more. As I began to wade through and dig through my mounds of content, I did something that I never did before I began compiling it all in one central location. Because I didn't have the systems in place, my content was scattered across the internet, leaving me vulnerable to losing all or parts of my content. If I ever got locked out of any of these platforms, which I didn't own. Though most of my content was already tucked away safely in Dropbox, there was a ton that wasn't there yet, that I had to put there.

11:50
Plus, I wanted to see all my content and be reminded of the awesomeness that I had spent years creating. For me, that place was a Google spreadsheet. I segmented my content into different categories. One of the pages have links to all my podcast episodes. Another for all the links to my guest appearances, many of which I've actually forgotten about. Yet another was for classes or workshops that I had taught. Plus I had a few others that held the content of my many online courses and miscellaneous pieces that didn't quite fit into any one of those categories specifically.

12:30
As a visual learner, this spreadsheet was exactly what I needed to see the massive amounts of content I had created. It was super eye-opening!

12:45
As an aside, if you haven't already created a central place to house all the content you've created, I highly encourage you to do so. It's one of the first things I do with my one on one clients. And they're always in awe at the sheer volume that they've created, which they've largely forgotten.

13:06
I discovered that by allocating the time I once spent on social media, to curating or digging into all of my content proved to be a very worthy endeavor. The more links I added to this document, the more I noticed patterns start to emerge.

13:26
The more I looked at this spreadsheet, a crazy idea began to emerge in the form of many what if questions, which is one of my default settings, I asked myself:

13:37
What if there was a way I can bundle these categories or buckets of content together?

13:45
What if I could monetize these buckets?

13:50
What if I could bundle and monetize this content in lots of different ways and at different price points?

13:58
What if I can offer more value to others with these bundles?

14:04
What if I could show others how to monetize their own content?

14:10
And that's how the idea of Content Gold Mining was born, even though that's not what I called it until fairly recently. I refered to it simply as content repurposing, even though I knew it to be a very different strategy and approach than what I learned and done it previously.

14:28
Instead of focusing on transforming one piece of content into hundreds, this new way of repurposing focuses on the many ways to MONETIZE all that beautiful content. Just like much of the gold mined in my great home state of Nevada is buried underground, so too, is much of the content you create. It's there for you. To support you and your business. It's there. Ready. Waiting for you to unearth it and offer it up as the gift that it is.

15:05
And I know as a course creator or coach, you have so much goodness, right now, waiting in the content you've already created. You currently have endless gifts you could offer to the world and get paid for doing so.

15:24
Let's play the what if game together, shall we and ponder a scenario that you could take action on today?

15:32
What have you stopped creating content today? For a week? Or even a month?

15:38
What if you reinvested some of that creation time into unearthing the gold from your own content goldmine?

15:47
What if you could turn your massive amounts of content into endless streams of income?

15:55
What if you could tap into that Gold Mine every time you wanted or needed to:

16:00
Take a family vacation. Hire a virtual assistant to help you put systems in place so that you could sell all the content that you want unearth. Hire someone to clean your house, do yard work, prep your meals and so much more so that you could free up time to spend with those you love? What about retire your parents or spouse?

16:25
And this is just the tip of the iceberg of what you could experience by mining for the gold in your content. Here's what one of my clients had to say, when we went through one of my content gold mining processes together. She says, "Wow, just wow. Yong certainly knows her stuff and the potency of content, namely your content. She quickly and effortlessly walks you through the value of your current content. She offers amazing options on delivering your hard work and talent found in your content and monetizing them as you offer your prospects irresistible offers. It's an emotional moment, when you realize your content can be massaged into other platforms to help others you must work with Yong."

17:18
When I got this message back, I was in awe at how profound this experience was. And this is what I've found since this client. That client after client when we go through the process that I take them through to really unearth their Content Gold Mines, they're always in awe. They begin to see the possibilities in their own content, and they get really excited.

17:42
This is where traditional style or "Gary Vee" style content repurposing really misses the mark. It's not focused on monetizing your awesome content. It can play a part in your marketing, if you have a plan and a strategy in place that works for you. I still use and teach this method today, though, it's only a small portion of a bigger whole. And I'm not nearly as fanatical about it, as I once was.

18:16
The real focus of the "Gary Vee" or traditional content repurposing has been on visibility and exposure, neither of which is a guaranteed for sales. And since sales are the lifeblood of every business, spending time on creating more content, just to create it, without a plan, without a strategy just doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

18:42
Wouldn't your time be better spent monetizing the content you already have?

18:48
Well, what if it didn't have to be either-or?

18:52
If you could create endless content for social media, and endless streams of income from the content you already have, without the overwhelm? Would you want to know how to do it?

19:06
You my friend absolutely deserve to have both! And the time to make it happen is now. The doors to Your Content Gold Mine™, my six-month mentorship will be opening up soon, and I'd love to be your guide on this amazing adventure.

19:22
During our time together, you'll learn and implement the four foundational pillars to mine the gold from your content. You'll get weekly Q&A calls with me, so that you can unearth Your Content Gold Mine™ in a way that not only feels good to you, but also supports your life and your business in the process. Plus so much more.

19:46
So my friend...If creating less content appeals to you. If monetizing the content you already have appeals to you. If having documented systems and processes to mine for the gold in your content appeals to you. If scaling or staffing your business appeals to you. If seeing all the possibilities in your awesome content appeals to you, then Your Content Gold Mine™ might be for you.

20:19
Let's talk about you and your awesome content. I don't often open up my calendar freely, however, since you're still listening to this episode, I want to gift you a call with me. All you have to do is go to today's show notes at www.YongPratt.com/334 and click on the "Book a Call" with me button you'll see there. If you're ready to ditch content, overwhelm, tap into an endless supply of social media content and make money from the content you've already created. Let's talk about you and your content goldmine. Book a call with me at www.YongPratt.com/334. Cheers my friend to unearthing Your Content Gold Mine™! I cannot wait to talk with you.

21:15
Thanks for tuning in, do the Amplify Your Awesome™ podcast. Let's continue this conversation inside my Facebook community the Arena of Awesome while it's still free and open to new members. Come share your biggest takeaways and ahas. Plus, every week inside the Arena, you'll get access to me and I may even share content I don't share anywhere else. Until next time, my friend, go out there today and Amplify Your Awesome™!


Quotes & Images to Share

Amplify Your Awesome™ - Podcast - Yong Pratt
From Nurse to Digital Ninja

From Nurse to Digital Ninja

[0:00] If you’ve ever considered shifting careers our guest today can speak into that with personal experience as she’s shifted in a very big way with Alex Pemberton

 

[2:01] How Alex pivoted from registered nurse to web designer and digital ninja. 

 

[5:41]How Alex’s career choices seem dissimilar things from the outside end up being exactly the same on the inside. 

 

[6:40] Family support and how Alex’s sister became her first paying client

 

[8:56]  Do businesses really need a website today?

 

[11:58] The biggest mistake with websites and how it could be affecting your site now

 

[17:14] Alex’s favorite way to create content

 

[19:27] Using video as a Human Design Projector 

 

[22:34] Where to connect with Alex online

 

Website: http://www.Alex-Pemberton.com 

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APHQstudio 

 

Check out Alex’s Class: https://alex-pemberton.com/tame-the-blocks/

 

Grab Alex’s 30-point inspection website checkup guide: http://www.Alex-Pemberton.com/amplify 

 

[24:37] Next week you’re gonna hear from Yong as she celebrates the one year anniversary of Amplify Your Awesome and her birthday week. Plus, Yong has a special gift for you to celebrate these milestones together!

 

Read Full Transcript

0:00
Hey there, Amplifiers! Welcome back to another episode of the Amplify Your Awesome™ Podcast. I am excited you are tuning in today because if you're someone that's ever considered shifting careers and you just weren't sure how to make that happen and worth the timing was right, our guest today can speak into that with personal experience. She's shifted in her career in a very big way. And you know how I love to bring you other entrepreneurs, and share their stories with you to inspire you on your journey, because entrepreneurship is definitely not a one-size-fits-all job for sure.

0:36
Have you ever felt like there was something missing in your business, something holding you back from the success that you're seeking? If so, you are not alone? For nearly 20 years, that's exactly how I felt as a business owner. It wasn't until I discovered Human Design, that it all became clear. And it turns out that I was the missing piece in my own business. joining me on this journey of discovering the real me and hear stories from other business owners, building businesses around all of their awesomeness. I'm Yong Pratt, and it's time my friend to Amplify Your Awesome™.

1:20
Our guest today is Alex Pemberton. And if you're ready to ditch the tech overwhelm, and focus on growing your business, you need Alex in your corner. She's a registered nurse turned web designer and digital ninja. And she creates and maintains beautiful and easy to use websites to help small business owners attract their dream clients. Yes, yes, yes. Give me more of that. Alex, I am so glad you said yes interview. We had an amazing chat before we even started this interview, and I'm ready to dive into some really meaty topics today. Welcome.

1:59
Thank you. Thank you for having me on.

2:01
So Alex, I want to know about this shift. Because I know when I share my story of being a dancer, choreographer, and now helping people with their content and repurposing and automation, they look at me like I had gone crazy. They think how could you possibly have been a dancer before? And now you're doing all this tech stuff? It doesn't even makes sense. But then when I explain to them, well, really, you know, choreographing a dance is very much like creating a new piece of content or putting together an automation to help people, you know, get to see your content more often. It's the same thing. So I'm sure going from nurse to web designer has caused some people to stop in their tracks. So let's talk about this shift and what caused the shift to happen for you.

2:52
Okay, so, as a nurse, I get to help people. And that's really why I got into it in the first place. I'm also very creative. I always have been. I've been sewing my clothes and making jewelry for as long as I can remember. And so this last job I had as a nurse was really, really tiring in in a mental way. There, there was a lot of stuff going on that was on the wrong side of ethical maybe. And so when we got ordered, I'm a military spouse. So when we got orders overseas, I said, Yes. This is the universe giving me a break. I can quit this job and do something different. And at first, I thought maybe I can just do some blogging, monetize it, talk about decluttering. That's my thing. And so I joined some groups, bloggers, and it quickly became obvious that many people felt completely overwhelmed with the tech side of blogging and their websites. And I thought this was funny because the tech part that's easy. I even even in nursing, I was always the one explaining to people how to use the system is unlike me, how do you not get it like this is? This is easy. You click here. You click there and submit them. Easy peasy, right? And when I explained it to them, people like Oh, that makes sense. I'm thinking well, it didn't before. Because I can explain all day, I'm happy to explain. And so I would help people in the groups. And eventually people were, you know, tagging me and saying, Hey, can I can I pay you to do this? Can I pay you to teach me to do this? Can you do this on my website? And I'm like, Okay, you know what, this is probably another sign from the universe. And forget blogging about the cluttering. Here's your new job, web design, and troubleshooting. And it really follows the same path as as in nursing, right. A patient comes in, you do the assessment, you figure out the diagnosis, you create a plan for for treating it. Execute, and then figure out if it's working right? You re-evaluate. Did it work? If it didn't? Okay, next thing we're going to try is this. And it's the same way with web design. You're looking at the existing website, or if there isn't one, that's the problem in itself, right? And you figure out what's wrong, what's working and what's not. To figure out a plan to fix it, then you fix it. And then you look, at the end, you reevaluate, right? You do get some diagnostics, like your analytics, Google Analytics, or what have you. And you're looking what worked, what didn't, what do we need to fix now? Okay, easy peasy. But it's really the same process.

5:41
I love it. And I just the idea that you listened to the universe, and that when the universe spoke up and said, Okay, we're gonna move you to a new location so you get to figure out what you're going to do. And you literally thought you were going to do one thing. But then by participating in these groups, people started asking you questions, and they started sending you invitations, which as a fellow Projector, that's a really big deal in our world for people to give us invitations to recognize us for our skill sets. And Projectors, I think, we also have an interesting way to look at the world. Like we look through the lens at the world differently than all of the other types of human design. So I think that really, as a tech person, as a fellow lover of tech, it's interesting how these very unsimilar things from the outside end up being exactly the same on the inside. So let me ask you this when you switch your careers, was your family supportive of that switch?

6:40
Yes, my husband is incredibly supportive of whatever I do, I could probably say, I'm gonna raze this house down and back. But in some ways, like he thinks I walk on water, and I couldn't do anything wrong. So if I think this is a good idea, he's like, go for it. And I love that about him. I mean, we've been together for 15 years, and it's been a great 15 years.

7:05
Amazing. And what's the rest of your family as supportive? Your parents or siblings?

7:10
My sister was very Yes. She actually was one of my first clients. She helped me kind of get into the maintenance portion. She says, Well, you know, I paid my accountant so much every month and to do my stepsister. She says, I will pay somebody to do maintenance for my website. And I said, you would like you paid me. I'll send you, I'll send you an invoice. So go ahead and invoice. So she was one of my first paying clients who actually got me into the continuity. And so that was, that was really great.

7:46
I love that your sister was one of your first clients. What a cool story that used to tell because I know sometimes when it comes to making big shifts and big pivots in business, family can sometimes, without trying to be mean, they can sometimes not be super supportive. So I love that your family was was gung ho and your your husband, you're saying he's, you know, he thinks you walk on water. I think that's so sweet. And the fact that you've been married for 15 years, and he's so supportive of you, I just think that is exactly what we all need, right? We need those that support system that validates and confirms the ideas we have in our heads to let us step into a new space confidently. I love this. So let's talk about websites. Because I've heard a lot of different sides of the story. Some people say in this day and age, you know, you don't need a website. Some people say all you need a website, not these other things. So as a web designer, as someone who helps people attract their dream clients, with a website, what is your take on a website in this day and age in 2020.

8:56
So you can say that I'm biased, but of course, I think you need a website. It is your single piece of real estate on the internet that you own, there is completely under your own control. Right social media accounts. They don't truly belong to us. They belong to the social media company. Facebook can decide at any moment that they will shut down your account. And good luck appealing that same thing with Instagram and wherever else you may be. But your website is your website. Now, do I think that just having your website is enough? No, of course not. You need to have an email list. You need to be on social media talking to people you need to be talking to people in person. But your website works while you sleep. When people look you up, they expect to see your website. They expect to they expect you to at least have something there. Right? So think about it. You are looking for an electrician or a dentist in your area because you just moved there. You go online and you say, best electrician in I don't know, Cheyenne, Wyoming, one of the places we live. So you're looking to see who's there, right? So if you come across all these Yelp things, and they know websites, do you trust them? Or are you going to go with the tool that maybe they do have a website that may not be that great, but it's better than nothing? Right? So yeah, in my opinion, you need a website, everybody needs a website, if you have a business, you need one, because it's there. When you're not awake, when you're not on your computer, when you're on vacation, and it speaks for you. It's your best salesperson.

10:45
I couldn't agree more. I know, It baffles me when I, when I live in a small town. So I'll just preface it by saying that. So I think people in a small town, they have a different perception of what a website does, right? They don't necessarily understand that. Even though they have an offline business, having that online portion is really an important piece of their success. Because if people aren't able to find you online, find out your hours. I know, I get frustrated. So businesses that don't have websites, I usually don't do business with them. Because I was so frustrated trying to find them and Google them for 30 minutes trying to find all these different things, and nothing comes up. You have to for me personally, that's kind of how I, I do my shopping and choose who we go to for certain services. But yeah, I totally get that. Having our own address. Having our own home on the internet, as big as it is, is a really important piece. And yes, we all those kind of things, too. So let me ask you this a follow up question. What is the biggest mistake that you see from business owners looking to update their websites, or maybe even starting their very first website? But what's the biggest mistake You see?

11:58
Okay, without going on a complete rant, the biggest mistake that I see people making is getting talked into a page builder. But let me start at the beginning. Okay. Back in the day, WordPress was wonderful. But you have to know how to code to create pages. So page builders came along as a workaround to that. And they allow people who didn't know how to code to create pages, right? The the post editor was really simple. It was very, you know, word based. So if you could do it in Word, you could do it on your website. But that wasn't, it didn't really give you anything to do your pages with only posts. And page builders are excellent workaround for that. However, we are now in the 21st century, and we have moved on. WordPress has moved on way past where it used to be. And we now have the block editor, which is excellent. And it allows you to create pages without any page builders. Now page builders, although they were great work around, they added to the weight of your website, right? They they slowed it down. So they came at a price. Back then it made sense to pay the price because nobody was really expecting a website to load in two seconds, right? People were so many people were you know, like on dial up. So they were gonna wait 15 minutes anyway.

13:27
So

13:29
I remember those days.

13:33
But, but now people are on their cell phones. And if it if it hasn't loaded in two or three seconds, they're gone. There's somewhere else. So it doesn't make sense to use a page builder. If If you want your website to load fast, because there is now a native solution that is so much faster. And second, if you're completely new to WordPress, it has a steep enough learning curve, that you do not need an extra piece of software to learn. They're not easy to learn, even though they they're sold, as you know, what you see is what you get kind of a drag and drop. There's a lot more to it. So please say no to page builders.

14:15
So I have a little confession then because when I started having to build my own websites kind of out of necessity, I knew nothing about them. And I do I knew nothing about code. So yes, the page builder for sure was the way for me to be able to quickly put a site together that didn't look like a three year old made it right. It kind of had some nice features to it, for sure. And, you know, I think we had this discussion last time we chatted as well, about the updates to the WordPress platform and how I still use the old version because I kind of liked that version. And you were trying to, you know, suggest that I might try the new version. But it's one of those things that trade off right there. At the end of the day, what is the opportunity cost for me to learn it or to hire somebody you know, because I will have to admit that I'm kind of a micromanager. I like to have my fingers and all the things and know how everything works. And I like to fiddle around. So sometimes it's hard for me to pass tech off to someone like yourself because I kind of like to go in there and, and, you know, do a little diagnosis on my own and say, Oh, I wonder what would happen if I just did this. I like to just play around. So it's interesting that you say that this page builder now in this day and age, though, I didn't realize that it actually slowed the load speed down. So I have I'll have to go reassess. Now, I'm using a theme. So I don't know if themes. Are those page builders? Are those considered page builders? Are those separate?

15:43
Now a theme is not a page builder, but there are themes that rely on a page builder or are built for page builders? And then there are those that are just made to work with the native interface?

15:57
No, I love it. So if you're listening, and you're thinking, what the heck are you guys talking about? I have no idea about WordPress. I have no idea about themes or page builders, it is okay. We're just having a conversation about you having a place to put your business online. So whether you use WordPress or another platform, there's lots to choose from out there. Just know that we're really talking about in this day and age, we want your page to load quickly. And we want it to look nice. And if you have questions for sure. Alex will share where you can connect with her at the end of the episode. So if you have follow up questions, because, of course me talking about this right now, I have follow up questions. But I didn't want to take up more time to talk about, you know, WordPress and the platform and page builders, because I think for some people, that might be something they've never encountered. And that's okay. We're just reach out to Alex at the end and say, okay, talk me through this, Alex, because I need some help. So let's shift gears a little bit Alex and talk about content. Because at the end of the day, a website in general, whether it's on WordPress, or a different platform, is really content. So when it comes to you creating content for your website, or for your social media, what is your favorite way to create?

17:14
So for a while, I did a lot of writing, not so much on my website. But I've been answering questions on Facebook groups, or in Facebook groups. But recently, I got into video. I did this ignite video challenge where we did a video every day now for like a little over three weeks. And the idea is that you go from really, like camera shy to really comfortable on camera. And that's how I want to go. Moving forward. I want to make videos for people, because I figure one you get to actually connect with me. And two, it makes it easier to to address questions as they come up. Because sometimes writing it down is like okay, well this this Do I have to have to worry about editing and how it looks versus getting on video where I just turned it on? And hey, how's it going? I'm Alex, let me answer your question by now.

18:14
Yeah, I love it. And I love video itself. But it took me a long time to say out loud, proudly that I love video. Because for me as a Projector with a defined throat center, speaking out loud and connecting with people, whether it's an audio or video is the easiest way for me to do that as well, even though I've written books, and yeah, I used to write a lot all the time. In this day and age, though, it's so much easier just to turn my phone on push record, just start talking. And whether that's a live video or in my notes app, or you know, on otter, my favorite transcription platform. Yeah, being able to just be in the energy of other people will be in the energy of the internet. And when it comes to reusing that content, video is the best content to repurpose, because it can be created into so many other things. And we have the most availability when it comes to video to audio to text to all these things. So I love that you said video because I'm always trying to talk to people about doing video and you know, there's always a lot of pushback. So what was it about video that drew you in now and why have you committed to doing video?

19:27
So with video, I think. So I'm a Projector as well. And with video, I figure you get to feel my energy. And you get to decide if I'm the person for you as a Projector. I don't get to tell you come work with me. Right? I can say, here's who I am. Here's what I have to offer. But the invitation has to come from the other person who says I love what you have to offer. Can you please do this for me and then and I am very right brained. So I have a lot of information that I don't even know is necessarily, and I don't always know how to pull it out, but other people can get it out of me. A lot of times, if you ask me a question, I'll give you an answer and then thinking, I knew that I didn't do that. So, so that's why I figured with video, I will attract the right people, and repel the ones who kind of look at me and go, Wait, she is crazy. Okay, fine. If you think I'm crazy, then don't even contact me, right? It'll save us both a lot of frustration. But if you think I am the person for you, then please let me know. And I will be happy to help you.

20:43
I love that. And I love that you use the word crazy, because I think we're all variations of crazy, we just have different kinds of crazy in our lives, right. And I know when I first came in, especially to the online business, I didn't want to rock the boat. I didn't want to offend anybody. I tried to speak to everybody. And that led to speaking to nobody, because I didn't know who I was speaking to. So being able to stand up and say, You know what, I'm kind of weird when it comes to this, and I am crazy about this. But if you want to hang and you'd like to be crazy to then come on over. So in and this podcast is really a testament to that is about helping business owners really stand in, in the spotlight of their own business, confidently, not saying okay, well, this is kind of weird. I'm going to hide this over here or this. I don't know if I want to share this. I'm going to show that over there. Because I lived that segmented, boxed up life, and tried to run a business like that. And it was so hard. Because nobody really knew who I was. Therefore, nobody really had an emotional connection to me. So yes. So if you're out there thinking, I don't know how I want to share this, I'm gonna challenge you all to go share that thing or go do the thing. Be crazy, in your own way. Be weird and embrace that, because that is how people find you. That is how you stand out from somebody who could literally be doing a video at the same time on the internet, attracting different people, right? There are people for all of us, there's enough to go around for sure there is no shortage of people who need all the things you have to offer. Now, Alex, I do want to make sure that if people have questions about their website about WordPress about not using a page builder, how do they go about finding you on the interwebs?

22:28
So obviously, I'm going to say on my website,

22:31
Absolutely!

22:34
www.Alex-Pemberton.com. I am also on Facebook as APHQ Studio. I'm pretty sure. And I also have a little freebie for the listeners that. So I have this website checkup Guide, which is basically a guide that takes you through a very quick 30-point inspection, kind of like if you would do your car, right of your website both the front end and the back end. So you can see where your website needs a little bit of TLC? And you can get that.

23:08
I love this. So where do we get this I don't want to stop.

23:12
Sorry, you can get it at www.Alex-Pemberton.com/amplify

23:18
Whoo, I love that you use the word amplify. And I will make sure I put all those links in the show notes for today's episode. Because I know there are people listening who are saying, Okay. I'm ready. I need someone to to look at my website, or I want to do this checkup with Alex do this 30-point checklist and make sure I'm doing the right things. Because when it comes to the world of tech, there are so many things that can go wrong. If you don't know what you're doing, right. I've been there. I've had to hire people, because I thought I knew what I was doing when it came to tech with my website. And then I literally broke things and I had to hire developers. And that gets really costly on the back end. So just do yourself a favor, save yourself some time headaches and money. Call Alex make sure you connect with her on Facebook or her website. Grab this checklist because I think once you've diagnosed yourself, you can then be armed with the information you need to say Alex, Okay, I'm ready to amplify my awesome with an even better website. So good. So Alex, I want to thank you so much for being here today. I enjoyed this conversation immensely. And I know that we'll have many more conversations to come

24:31
Thank you, Yong. This has really been fun. I was scared to come on here but I had a lot of fun.

24:37
Stay tuned because next week you're gonna hear from me. It happens to be my birthday week and we're celebrating the one year anniversary of Amplify Your Awesome™. And I have a special gift for you so that we can celebrate these milestones together. I'll see you then.

24:57
Thanks for tuning in to the Amplify Your Awesome™. podcast. Be sure to hit that subscribe button so you don't miss any tips, tricks or secrets on building a business based around your awesome. Hey, and while you're there, leave us a rating and review. Let us know what you think of the show. And until next time, my friends, go out there today and Amplify Your Awesome™!


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Alex Pemberton - Amplify Your Awesome™ Podcast - Yong Pratt
Amplify Your Awesome™ Podcast - Yong Pratt - Alex Pemberton
Yong Pratt - Alex Pemberton - Amplify Your Awesome™ Podcast
Empowering women through coding

Empowering women through coding

[0:00] Meet Julia Taylor, a self-taught coder that’s turned that skill into a global Empire she calls a Geek Pack by empowering women through coding

 

[1:21] From former military wife and lover of location independence to teach over 1400 women to say yes to any WordPress requests, most of whom have never touched a line of code in their lives

 

[3:13] WordPress: Love at first sight for Julia

 

[5:15] How being a full-time RVer turned into teaching WordPress

 

[9:14] Breaking into a very male-dominated career and why community is an essential element of Geek Pack 

 

“Learning a new language is not the easiest thing. So you want people around you that can help you and empower you.”

 

[13:27] Imposter Syndrome, claiming your title, and getting uncomfortable 

 

[17:05] Content creation, strategy, social posting schedules

 

[19:51] Planning for consistency 

 

[22:37] Julia’s tip for helping you embrace your awesome and letting is shine through in your business

 

[26:23] Connect with Julia at http://www.GeekPack.co and sign up for her free five-day coding challenge. 

 

[27:15] Age is irrelevant when it comes to coding

 

[28:02] Share your biggest takeaways from today’s episode with Julia over at http://www.YongPratt.com/319. Next week,  And be sure to share this episode with your friends. Next week, you’ll meet Alex Pemberton, who traded in her nursing scrubs to become a WordPress developer and a designer. 

 


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Amplify Your Awesome™ - Yong Pratt- Julia Taylor
Julia Taylor - Yong Pratt - Amplify Your Awesome™
Amplify Your Awesome™ - Yong Pratt - Episode 319